• Antonio Salgado
    I saw Conor for the first time when I injured my knee a couple of months back. My injury was the result of a muscular imbalance that required me to exercise more other parts of my leg in order to relieve the pain. Color's knowledge instructions and follow up helped me to recover fast. He made sure that I regained the strength that I needed in order to heal. I had to work hard and Conor pushed me harder every week but at the end the results were amazing. It helps that he is also very kind and attentive. Now, after I healed, Conor and I have been working on my back, as I have been suffering from pain in my lower back for years. His exercises and care have made me improve and feel better. I will keep working with him as he has helped me with my injuries.
  • Madeline Wong
    Andrew is a very meticulous physiotherapist. From the questions that he asks me, I know that he genuinely wants to do his job well. This makes me feel very safe as I know that he is not taking any risks with my knee condition. From day one, Andrew has made me feel very comfortable in his presence. This is important because it would be awful to have to spend 45 mins with him every weekend if I’m not comfortable with him prodding my knee and quads. He is also very encouraging, which is a very vital quality in a physiotherapist as it gives me great motivation to push myself harder at each session and to continue doing the exercises that he has recommended during the week. I would certainly recommend Andrew to my friends if they need to see a physiotherapist.

Neck Injuries

Neck Pain & Injury Treatment

Neck pain is very common and can be very disabling as well as painful. In the absolute majority of all neck patients at PhysioActive the pain is caused by acute inflammations or tight muscles. Sometimes the pain is localized in the neck, but it may also refer to the thoracic spine or shoulder. If the nerve is irritated the pain may even radiate into the arm or fingers. Common causes are poor posture, joint degeneration, muscular weakness, stress and general inactivity.

  • Price List

    1 session

    S$ 70

    5 session

    S$ 665

    20 session

    S$ 1,260

    1 session

    S$ 90

    5 session

    S$ 855

    20 session

    S$ 1,620

    1 session

    S$ 110

    5 session

    S$ 1,045

    20 session

    S$ 1,980

Common Neck Injuries:

  • Acute neck pain

    Acute neck pain is defined as nonspecific or mechanical pain present for up to six weeks. It has no serious underlying pathology or nerve injury and is often unrelated to a specific activity. 98% of all neck patients are related to nonspecific acute neck pain. It is the most prevalent orthopedic injury among our modern society and 80% of all people experience a significant episode of neck pain at some point of their lives. Rest, pain killers and physiotherapy, including massage, stretching, strengthening exercises and posture training is the choice of treatment for returning to a pain free life and to prevent acute neck pain from reoccurrence.

  • Disc herniation

    A herniated disc, also known as a slipped disc or ruptured disc, is a common condition in where one of the cushion-like discs between the vertebrae moves out of position and presses on the nerves of the spinal cord. A herniated disc can irritate those nerves and sometimes result in pain, numbness or weakness in the arm or fingers. Most people who have a herniated disc don’t need any surgery. In this case conservative treatment including rest, medication and physiotherapy will help to fully recover.

  • Cervical spondylosis

    Cervical spondylosis is a general term for age-related wear and tear affecting the disc and joints in your neck. In most cases conservative treatment with physiotherapy can reduce the pain significantly and allows the patients to have a rather normal life without many restrictions. Only in very severe cases the choice of treatment might be surgery.

  • Whiplash

    Whiplash is an injury that occurs after sudden extreme movements to the head, like in a car accident. This extreme motion may damage soft tissues including muscles, ligaments and capsule. Compensatory muscle activity to protect the head may cause further damage. Pain can be localized in the neck, but often radiates into the head or further down the spine. Most people recover from whiplash with physiotherapy in just a few weeks, but without treatment some people may develop chronic pain after a whiplash injury.

  • Spinal stenosis

    Tension headaches are the most common type of headaches among adults. They are commonly referred to as stress headaches. An acute episodic tension headache may be described as a mild to moderate constant band-like pain, tightness, or pressure around the forehead or back of the head and neck. Some patients develop chronic tension headaches which are much more frequent and the pain is usually throbbing and affects the front, top and side of the head. In some people, tension headaches are caused by tightened muscles in the back of the neck and scalp. Common causes for tightened muscles are inadequate rest, poor posture, stress, depression, anxiety, fatigue and overexertion. In other people the cause remains unknown. Physiotherapy can help by aiming at eliminating the cause of the pain.

  • Fracture of the vertebra

    Spinal stenosis refers to narrowing of the spinal canal and is most commonly caused by degeneration of the discs between the vertebrae. The result is compression of the nerve leading to pins & needles sensation in the arms and fingers. Mild to moderate spinal stenosis is treated with Physiotherapy to relieve the nerve irritation. Posture training and muscle strengthening play an important role to support the neck. However, when symptoms are severe and persistent, surgical resection of the tissue that is impinging the nerve may be necessary.

  • Tension headache

    Spinal stenosis refers to narrowing of the spinal canal and is most commonly caused by degeneration of the discs between the vertebrae. The result is compression of the nerve leading to pins & needles sensation in the arms and fingers. Mild to moderate spinal stenosis is treated with Physiotherapy to relieve the nerve irritation. Posture training and muscle strengthening play an important role to support the neck. However, when symptoms are severe and persistent, surgical resection of the tissue that is impinging the nerve may be necessary.

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Shoulder Injuries

Shoulder Pain & Injury Treatment

The shoulder is the most mobile joint in your body and hence very prone to injuries. Shoulder pain is very common, but is most often felt on the outside of the upper arm rather than in the joint itself. In most cases the pain develops gradually over a long time without any known reason to the patient. In the beginning lifting the arm feels uncomfortable, but after a while it turns into a sharp pain. At later stages the pain might even be constant during day and night and can radiate in severe cases into the forearm and hand. In those cases the joint has stiffened already significantly and daily activities are severely impaired. Repetitive movements with poor posture and muscular weakness are usually the cause of the problem and lead to inflammation of the rotator cuff (muscles surrounding the shoulder) or bursa (protective fat pad).

Traumatic injuries usually occur after bike accidents or falls onto the shoulder. In these cases the tendons might be ruptured or a bone fractured. These conditions may require surgery and rehabilitation afterwards.

  • Price List

    1 session

    S$ 70

    5 session

    S$ 665

    20 session

    S$ 1,260

    1 session

    S$ 90

    5 session

    S$ 855

    20 session

    S$ 1,620

    1 session

    S$ 110

    5 session

    S$ 1,045

    20 session

    S$ 1,980

Common Shoulder Injuries:

  • Tendonitis

    Tendonitis refers to an inflammation (-itis) of the tendon, which connects the muscle belly with the bone. It is one of the most frequent reasons for shoulder pain. Common causes are overuse of the muscles, repetitive movements of the arm and shoulder and poor biomechanics. Physiotherapy helps to reduce the pain and inflammation and restores proper movement of the shoulder.

  • Impingement

    Impingement refers to a trapping of usually one of the tendons of the rotator cuff between the shoulder roof and the humerus. When the arm is moved upwards and rotated inwards (e.g. freestyle swimming or putting the hand behind the back) the soft tissues are compressed. Over time this tendon usually develops an inflammation (please click for more information on tendonitis). It can occur in any sports with repetitive shoulder movements, any daily activity with lifting the arm above 90° or simply frequent computer work. The reason is usually poor biomechanics, a hunched back, muscular weakness and joint stiffness. The problem can be further complicated by irregular bony outgrowths (bone spurs), which are often present in people above the age of 50. In the acute painful stage physiotherapy helps reducing the pain and inflammation. Once the condition improves exercise therapy will be added optimizing the strength and restoring optimal biomechanics with the goal to prevent recurrent shoulder problems.

  • Frozen shoulder

    Frozen shoulder or adhesive capsulitis refers to an inflammation and stiffening of the joint capsule. The cause is still unknown; however, there are a number of risk factors predisposing you to developing frozen shoulder:

    • shoulder trauma
    • surgery
    • diabetes
    • inflammatory conditions
    • inactivity of the shoulder
    • autoimmune disease

    Frozen shoulder has three stages, each of which has different symptoms:

    1. Freezing – During this stage, pain occurs with any movement of the shoulder, and the range of motion starts to become limited.
    2. Frozen – Pain may begin to diminish during this stage. However, the shoulder becomes stiffer, and the range of motion decreases notably.
    3. Thawing – During the thawing stage, the range of motion in the shoulder begins to improve until full recovery is regained.

    Each of these stages can last a number of months. Physiotherapy can help to optimize recovery, but each patient reacts different to the treatment. Therefore it is impossible to give the patient an exact recovery timeline.

    Approximately 20% of people who have had a frozen shoulder will also develop frozen shoulder in their other shoulder in the future.

  • Acromioplasty

    Acromioplasty refers to a surgical procedure in which parts of the bony shoulder roof (acromion) is excised to create more space in between the acromion and the humerus. The reason is to prevent an impingement (please click for more information on impingement) of the rotator cuff in between those two structures, which can lead to chronic or recurrent shoulder pain. The rehabilitation takes about 8-12 weeks depending on the complexity of the surgery. After successful completion of the rehabilitation the patient will have regained full function of the shoulder without any restrictions in daily life and sport.

  • Rotator cuff repair

    A rotator cuff repair refers to a surgical procedure in which the torn part of the rotator cuff is re-attached to the bone. In most cases this is done by keyhole surgery (small buttonhole-sized incisions). Only with larger and complex tears the surgeon might opt for an open procedure. The rehabilitation takes about 3-6 months depending of the complexity of the surgery. After successful completion of the rehabilitation the patient will have regained full function of the shoulder without any restrictions in daily life and sport.

  • Bankart repair

    A Bankart procedure refers to a surgical technique for the repair of recurrent shoulder joint dislocations (please click for more information on shoulder dislocation). In the procedure, the torn ligaments are re-attached to the proper place in the shoulder joint, with the goal of restoring normal function. The rehabilitation takes about 8-12 weeks depending on the complexity of the surgery. After successful completion of the rehabilitation the patient will have regained full function of the shoulder without any restrictions in daily life and sport.

  • Shoulder dislocation

    A humerus fracture is an injury to the bone of the upper arm close to the shoulder joint. This happens most commonly after a fall or in elderlies with osteoporosis. The majority of patients can be treated conservatively with a sling. The fracture will heal usually within 6-8 weeks with the help of physiotherapy treatment to restore full function.

    Surgery may be required when the bone fragments are far out of position or if the fracture extends into the joint. The rehabilitation takes usually at least 6 months depending on the severity of the injury. Especially elderlies may not regain full function even after optimal treatment.

  • (Multidirectional-) instability

    There are two forms of dislocations:

    • Partial dislocation (subluxation): the head of the humerus slips out of the socket momentarily and then snaps back into place
    • Full dislocation: the head of the humerus comes completely out of the socket

    In most cases this happens forcefully after an accident or fall. However, some patients with severe shoulder instability (please click for more information on shoulder instability) may dislocate their shoulder by simply reaching up for something. If the shoulder does not ‘pop in’ by itself, the doctor will move the head of the humerus back into the shoulder joint socket under anesthetics.

    Most people regain full shoulder function with the help of physiotherapy within a few weeks.

    However, some dislocations may have damaged the shoulder too severely that surgical repair (please click for more information on Bankart repair) is necessary. This may also be the case with frequent re-dislocations as the shoulder has become too unstable. Post-surgical rehabilitation takes about 3-6 months depending of the complexity of the surgery. After successful completion of the rehabilitation the patient will have regained full function of the shoulder without any restrictions in daily life and sport.

  • Fractures

    There are two forms of dislocations:

    • Partial dislocation (subluxation): the head of the humerus slips out of the socket momentarily and then snaps back into place
    • Full dislocation: the head of the humerus comes completely out of the socket

    In most cases this happens forcefully after an accident or fall. However, some patients with severe shoulder instability (please click for more information on shoulder instability) may dislocate their shoulder by simply reaching up for something. If the shoulder does not ‘pop in’ by itself, the doctor will move the head of the humerus back into the shoulder joint socket under anesthetics.

    Most people regain full shoulder function with the help of physiotherapy within a few weeks.

    However, some dislocations may have damaged the shoulder too severely that surgical repair (please click for more information on Bankart repair) is necessary. This may also be the case with frequent re-dislocations as the shoulder has become too unstable. Post-surgical rehabilitation takes about 3-6 months depending of the complexity of the surgery. After successful completion of the rehabilitation the patient will have regained full function of the shoulder without any restrictions in daily life and sport.

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Elbow Injuries

Elbow Pain & Injury Treatment

Elbow pain and injury respond favourably to physiotherapy intervention when early treatment is sought.

An accurate diagnosis is vital to the correct management of your elbow pain. It can be caused by local muscle, tendon or joint injury. Alternatively, elbow pain can be referred from your neck joints. It’s similar to sciatica of the upper limb.

Please do not delay in consulting your physiotherapist if you experience elbow pain. Many elbow conditions may take many months to heal when symptoms are neglected or the diagnosis is incorrect.

  • Price List

    1 session

    S$ 70

    5 session

    S$ 665

    20 session

    S$ 1,260

    1 session

    S$ 90

    5 session

    S$ 855

    20 session

    S$ 1,620

    1 session

    S$ 110

    5 session

    S$ 1,045

    20 session

    S$ 1,980

Common Back Injuries:

  • Tennis elbow

    Acute lower back pain is defined as nonspecific or mechanical pain present for up to six weeks. It has no serious underlying pathology or nerve injury and is often unrelated to a specific activity. 98% of all back patients are related to nonspecific acute lower back pain. It is the most prevalent orthopedic injury among our modern society and 80% of all people experience a significant episode of lower back pain at some point of their lives. Rest, pain killers and physiotherapy, including massage, stretching, strengthening exercises and posture training is the choice of treatment for returning to a pain free life and to prevent acute lower back pain from reoccurrence.

  • Golfer’s elbow

    Golfer’s elbow or medial epicondylitis is a condition that causes pain on the inner side of your elbow, where the tendons of your forearm muscles are attached to the bony bump. In more severe cases the pain may even spread into your forearm and wrist. A golfer’s elbow is not only limited to golfers, but occurs also in any other activity which involves the wrist or clenching the fingers. The cause is commonly overuse and repetitive movements. In the acute painful stage physiotherapy helps reducing the pain and inflammation. Once the condition improves exercise therapy will be added optimizing the strength and restoring optimal biomechanics with the goal to prevent recurrent elbow problems.

    PhysioActive is one of the very few clinics in Singapore who can offer you shockwave therapy. This is one of the most effective and fastest ways of treating this condition (please click for more information on shockwave therapy).

  • Forearm fracture

    Forearm fracture is very common among all different age groups and is in most cases due to falls. Patients usually need to wear a cast for 6 weeks and can start rehabilitation right afterwards. The rehabilitation takes about 6-8 weeks depending on the complexity of the fracture. After successful completion of the rehabilitation the patient will have regained full function of the arm without any restrictions in daily life and sport.

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Back Injuries

Back Pain & Injury Treatment

Back pain is very common and can be very disabling as well as painful. In the absolute majority of all lower back patients at PhysioActive the pain is caused by acute inflammations or tight muscles. Sometimes the pain is localized in the lower spine, but often it can radiate into the hip or buttock. If the nerve is irritated the pain may even radiate into the leg or foot. Common causes are poor posture, joint degeneration, muscular weakness, stress and general inactivity.

  • Price List

    1 session

    S$ 70

    5 session

    S$ 665

    20 session

    S$ 1,260

    1 session

    S$ 90

    5 session

    S$ 855

    20 session

    S$ 1,620

    1 session

    S$ 110

    5 session

    S$ 1,045

    20 session

    S$ 1,980

Common Back Injuries:

  • Acute lower back pain

    Acute lower back pain is defined as nonspecific or mechanical pain present for up to six weeks. It has no serious underlying pathology or nerve injury and is often unrelated to a specific activity. 98% of all back patients are related to nonspecific acute lower back pain. It is the most prevalent orthopedic injury among our modern society and 80% of all people experience a significant episode of lower back pain at some point of their lives. Rest, pain killers and physiotherapy, including massage, stretching, strengthening exercises and posture training is the choice of treatment for returning to a pain free life and to prevent acute lower back pain from reoccurrence.

  • Disc herniation

    A herniated disc, also known as a slipped disc or ruptured disc, is a common condition in where one of the cushion-like discs between the vertebrae moves out of position and presses on the nerves of the spinal cord. A herniated disc can irritate those nerves and sometimes result in pain, numbness or weakness in the leg or toes. However, most people who have a herniated disc don’t need any surgery. Conservative treatment including medication, rest and physiotherapy will help to fully recover

  • Sciatica

    Sciatica refers to pain that radiates along the path of the sciatic nerve, which branches from your lower back through your hips and buttocks and down each leg. Injury to the sciatic nerve may cause the characteristic sharp, burning pain to one of its branches. Physiotherapy can help to relieve pain and to restore full function.

  • Lumbar spondylosis

    Lumbar spondylosis is a general term for age-related wear and tear affecting the disc and joints in your lower back. In most cases conservative treatment with physiotherapy can reduce the pain significantly and allows the patients to have a rather normal life without many restrictions. Only in very severe cases the choice of treatment might be surgery.

  • Scoliosis

    Scoliosis means a side-to-side (lateral) curvature of the spine usually combined with a rotation of the vertebras. Scoliosis usually develops during childhood and the cause is still unknown. Physiotherapy plays an essential role in the treatment of this condition and comprises posture training, back exercises and in more severe cases also bracing.

  • Spinal stenosis

    Spinal stenosis refers to narrowing of the spinal canal and is most commonly caused by degeneration of the discs between the vertebrae. The result is compression of the nerve leading to pins & needles sensation in the legs and feet. Mild to moderate spinal stenosis is treated with physiotherapy to relieve the nerve irritation. Posture training and muscle strengthening play an important role to support the lower back. However, when symptoms are severe and persistent, surgical resection of the tissue that is impinging the nerve may be necessary.

  • Fracture of the vertebra

    A fractured vertebra is usually associated with a major trauma, such as from a fall or car accident. However, patients with osteoporosis can suffer from a broken vertebra without even knowing it.

    Injuries can range from relatively mild fractures with only localized back pain to severe fractures with associated spinal cord injury. Depending on how severe the injury is the patient may experience pain in the back, difficulty with walking, or even the inability to move the legs (paralysis). Many fractures heal with conservative treatment; however severe fractures may require surgery to realign the bones.

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Hand Injuries

Hand Pain & Injury Treatment

The hand is one of the most important ‘tools’ of our body. That’s why injuries to the hand are
usually very disabling in daily activities. The most common causes of injuries are due to sports, falls and accidents. One of the most important aspects with hand injuries is that patients should not wait too long to seek for medical help from a doctor or physiotherapist, because chronic hand conditions may take an unreasonable time to heal.

  • Price List

    1 session

    S$ 70

    5 session

    S$ 665

    20 session

    S$ 1,260

    1 session

    S$ 90

    5 session

    S$ 855

    20 session

    S$ 1,620

    1 session

    S$ 110

    5 session

    S$ 1,045

    20 session

    S$ 1,980

Common Hand Injuries:

  • Sprains

    Groin strains happen in most cases during sport activities. The cause is either overuse or excessive load to the muscle (sprinting or jumping). The severity and symptoms of a muscle strain depends on the degree of stretching or tearing of the muscle.

    1. Grade I strain: This is a mild strain and only some muscle fibres have been damaged. Healing occurs within 2-3 weeks.
    2. Grade II strain: This is a moderate strain with more extensive damage to muscle fibres, but the muscle is not completely ruptured. Healing occurs within 3-6 weeks.
    3. Grade III strain: This is a severe injury with a complete rupture of muscle fibres. The healing period can be up to three months and may in severe cases require surgery.

    Physiotherapy optimizes the healing process. Exercise therapy, incl. stretching-, strengthening- and stability exercises helps to restore full function of the muscle.

  • Fractures

    Fractures are common to the hand/wrist and happen usually during sport or after a fall. Depending on the location and the severity of the fracture, treatment may be conservative or needs surgery. In both cases physiotherapy play an important role for recovery to help to regain full function of the hand and fingers.

  • Carpal tunnel syndrome

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a condition in which the median nerve is compressed as it passes through an opening from the wrist to the hand called the carpal tunnel. Women develop carpal tunnel syndrome 3 times more frequently than men. Symptoms may be pain in the hand or altered sensation such as tingling and numbness. One of the common causes is repetitive movements of the wrist, especially when the wrist is bent inward. Swelling in this area also leads to compression of the nerve. The cause may be pregnancy, obesity, arthritis, certain thyroid conditions, diabetes.

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Hip Injuries

Hip Pain & Injury Treatment

Hip injuries and knee pain are very common and can have many causes:

  • traumatic (eg sports injury)
  • wear & tear (eg arthrosis)
  • muscle weakness
  • muscle tightness
  • overuse
  • biomechanical dysfunction

Therefore it is essential to make a correct diagnosis of the underlying cause in order to provide appropriate treatment for an optimal recovery. Injuries may affect muscles, ligaments, meniscus, cartilage or bones. Most commonly the pain is localized around the injured area and can be felt during activity, after activity or constantly. Many injuries can be treated conservatively with physiotherapy. However, with more severe injuries surgery may be necessary. In this case the patient will need post-surgical rehabilitation.

  • Price List

    1 session

    S$ 70

    5 session

    S$ 665

    20 session

    S$ 1,260

    1 session

    S$ 90

    5 session

    S$ 855

    20 session

    S$ 1,620

    1 session

    S$ 110

    5 session

    S$ 1,045

    20 session

    S$ 1,980

Common Hip Injuries:

  • Groin strain

    Sprains refer to injuries to a ligament. Ligaments are connected to bones and stabilize the joint in between them. Unlike muscles, they are very poorly supplied by blood. Hence, the healing process usually takes much longer. In most cases conservative treatment with splints, adjusted activity and physiotherapy is sufficient to restore full function.

  • Labral tear

    The hip or acetabular labrum is a ridge of cartilage that runs around the rim of your hip joint socket. Its purpose is to make the hip socket deeper and more stable. The labrum can be torn from its attachment and cause pain, clicking or catching. The most common causes are falls or sporting injuries when the hip is forced into extreme positions. It can also be damaged by repetitive movements in sport activities like football, golf, running or cycling. Common contributing factors for these causes are degenerative changes of the labrum or poor biomechanics.

    In the acute stage of a labral tear physiotherapy is aimed at reducing pain and inflammatory signs. At a later stage exercise therapy including strengthening and stretching exercises becomes a vital part of the therapy to restore full function of the hip.

    A percentage of hip labral tears will require surgery to stop the pain and clicking. The procedure should also improve the hip joint integrity, which reduce future degeneration associated with labral tears.

  • Osteoarthritis

    Hip bursitis is a painful condition at the site of the hip. The bursa is small jelly like sack positioned between the hip bone and soft tissues, acting as cushions to help reduce friction. With repetitive activities like running or cycling the bursa can become inflamed. In the early stage pain is usually felt only during activities, but with progressing intensity pain may be felt also after activities or at rest.

    Physiotherapy aims to reduce pain and inflammation signs including modalities, massage and stretching. In the later stage exercise therapy focuses on strengthening the muscles surrounding the hip to restore full function and to prevent reoccurrence

  • Hip replacement

    Hip osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition where the articular cartilage of your hip joint gradually wears away, exposing the underlying bone. As the arthritis progresses, bony spurs also develop in and around your hip joint in response to the change in load distribution and biomechanics. Common causes are age, overweight, excessive loading sports, previous hip injuries and genetics. Although this is a chronic condition you can have acute episodes as well. The cause for this is overloading during sport, daily activities and even work. The symptoms are pain and stiffness in the hip, clicking or grating and decreased strength of the lower limb muscles. During an acute episode physiotherapy helps to reduce pain, inflammation signs and regain flexibility.

    During non-acute episodes it is very important to do regular exercises in order to optimize strength, stability and flexibility. This will help to maintain your hip’s function and to avoid surgery. Your physiotherapist will tailor a trainings program for your specific needs.

    In advanced stages of osteoarthritis pain might become chronic even with regular exercises. In this case hip replacement is the last resort of help (please click for more information on hip replacement)

  • Bursitis

    Hip osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition where the articular cartilage of your hip joint gradually wears away, exposing the underlying bone. As the arthritis progresses, bony spurs also develop in and around your hip joint in response to the change in load distribution and biomechanics. Common causes are age, overweight, excessive loading sports, previous hip injuries and genetics. Although this is a chronic condition you can have acute episodes as well. The cause for this is overloading during sport, daily activities and even work. The symptoms are pain and stiffness in the hip, clicking or grating and decreased strength of the lower limb muscles. During an acute episode physiotherapy helps to reduce pain, inflammation signs and regain flexibility.

    During non-acute episodes it is very important to do regular exercises in order to optimize strength, stability and flexibility. This will help to maintain your hip’s function and to avoid surgery. Your physiotherapist will tailor a trainings program for your specific needs.

    In advanced stages of osteoarthritis pain might become chronic even with regular exercises. In this case hip replacement is the last resort of help (please click for more information on hip replacement)

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Knee Injuries

Knee Pain & Injury Treatment

Knee injuries and knee pain are very common and can have many causes:

  • traumatic (eg sports injury)
  • wear & tear (eg arthrosis)
  • muscle weakness
  • muscle tightness
  • overuse
  • biomechanical dysfunction

Therefore it is essential to make a correct diagnosis of the underlying cause in order to provide appropriate treatment for an optimal recovery. Injuries may affect muscles, ligaments, meniscus, cartilage or bones. Most commonly the pain is localized around the injured area and can be felt during activity, after activity or constantly. Many injuries can be treated conservatively with physiotherapy. However, with more severe injuries surgery may be necessary. In this case the patient will need post-surgical rehabilitation.

  • Price List

    1 session

    S$ 70

    5 session

    S$ 665

    20 session

    S$ 1,260

    1 session

    S$ 90

    5 session

    S$ 855

    20 session

    S$ 1,620

    1 session

    S$ 110

    5 session

    S$ 1,045

    20 session

    S$ 1,980

Common Knee Injuries:

  • Patellofemoral pain syndrome

    The calf consists of two muscles, the gastrocnemius and the soleus. Most injuries happen during sport activities that involve sprinting, jumping or landing and stopping. In most cases overuse and excessive loading is the cause of the injury. Injury to a muscle (muscle belly or tendon) is called a strain. The severity and symptoms of a muscle strain depends on the degree of stretching or tearing of the muscle.

    1. Grade I strain: This is a mild strain and only some muscle fibres have been damaged. Healing occurs within 2-3 weeks.
    2. Grade II strain: This is a moderate strain with more extensive damage to muscle fibres, but the muscle is not completely ruptured. Healing occurs within 3-6 weeks.
    3. Grade III strain: This is a severe injury with a complete rupture of muscle fibres. The healing period can be up to three months and may in severe cases require surgery.

    Physiotherapy optimizes the healing process. exercise therapy, incl. stretching-, strengthening- and stability exercises helps to restore full function of the muscle and to avoid reoccurrence.

  • Patellar tendonitis

    Patellar tendonitis is an overuse injury affecting your knee. A common name for it is jumper’s knee or runner’s knee. It is the result of your patella tendon (tendon of the quadriceps) being overstressed due to repetitive sport activities, sudden increase in trainings intensity or generally too high trainings intensity. Pain is located in the front of the knee and may occur during or after activities.

    During the acute stage physiotherapy helps to reduce pain and inflammation signs. Once the condition improves exercise therapy incl. stretching-, strengthening- and stability exercises helps to restore full function of the knee and to avoid reoccurrence.

  • Muscle strain

    Muscular strains happen in most cases during sport activities. The cause is either overuse or excessive load to the muscle (sprinting or jumping). The severity and symptoms of a muscle strain depends on the degree of stretching or tearing of the muscle.

    1. Grade I strain: This is a mild strain and only some muscle fibres have been damaged. Healing occurs within 2-3 weeks.
    2. Grade II strain: This is a moderate strain with more extensive damage to muscle fibres, but the muscle is not completely ruptured. Healing occurs within 3-6 weeks.
    3. Grade III strain: This is a severe injury with a complete rupture of muscle fibres. The healing period can be up to three months and may in severe cases require surgery.

    Physiotherapy optimizes the healing process. Exercise therapy, incl. stretching-, strengthening- and stability exercises helps to restore full function of the muscle.

  • ITB syndrome

    The ITB (iliotibial band) is a thick band of fibers that begins at the border of the most prominent bone of the pelvis and runs on the outside of the thigh to the shinbone. The ITB Syndrome is one of the most common causes of pain in runners and cyclists. In many cases it is caused by altered biomechanics and muscle imbalance (weak and tight muscles), which leads to friction between the ITB and the femoral condyle (prominent bony part on the outside of the knee). Commonly overuse irritates the ITB and develops into pain and eventually inflammation. The symptoms are pain and tightness on the outside of the knee and stiffness along the ITB. In more severe cases bending the knee is reduced and painful. If poor running technique is the cause of the problem, the physiotherapist will perform a biomechanical running analysis to optimize the patient’s running technique. The physiotherapy treatment will first aim to reduce inflammation and friction of the ITB. Once pain and inflammation have subsided exercise therapy will restore normal muscular function to prevent this problem from reoccurrence.

  • Ligament injury

    Knee replacement, or knee arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure to replace the weight-bearing surfaces of the knee joint to relieve pain and disability. It is most commonly performed for osteoarthritis (wear & tear of the cartilage). That’s why this procedure is mostly seen among the elderly population. Knee replacement surgery can be performed as a partial or a total knee replacement. In general, the surgery consists of replacing the diseased or damaged joint surfaces of the knee with metal and plastic components shaped to allow continued motion of the knee. The rehabilitation takes 6-12 months depending on the recovery process. After successful completion of the rehabilitation the patient can participate in life without many restrictions. Sport activities have to be adjusted and the knee might not be able to fully bend.

  • ACL injury & reconstruction

    The ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) is one of four knee ligaments that are critical to the stability of the knee joint. The ACL is made of tough fibrous material and functions to control excessive knee motion by limiting joint mobility. An ACL injury is usually a sports-related knee injury, but it may also happen during simple daily activities where the knee is suddenly twisted.

    ACL tears do not necessarily require ACL reconstruction surgery. There are several important factors to consider before deciding to undergo ACL reconstruction surgery.

    • The patient‘s age?
    • Does the patient regularly perform sports or activities that normally require a functional ACL?
    • Does the patient experience knee instability?
    • What are the patient’s plans for the future?

    If the patient doesn’t participate in a multi-directional sport (tennis, football, martial arts etc.) that requires a strong and healthy ACL, and he doesn’t have an unstable knee, then he may not need ACL surgery. Regular knee strengthening and stability exercises given by a physiotherapist may be sufficient to maintain a pain free life.

    However, if the patient wishes to continue with vivid sports activities, he will have to undergo ACL reconstruction. A repair of the anterior cruciate ligament is rarely a possibility, and thus the ACL is reconstructed using another tendon or ligament to substitute for the torn ligament. Post-surgical rehabilitation takes about 9-12 months depending of the complexity of the surgery. After successful completion of the rehabilitation the patient will have regained full function of the knee without any restrictions in daily life and sport.

  • Meniscus injury & meniscectomy

    The meniscus is a small, “c” shaped piece of cartilage that sits between the femur (thigh bone) and the tibia (shin bone), one on the outside (lateral meniscus) and one on the inside of the knee (medial meniscus). They help absorbing weight within the knee like a cushion as well as providing stability during movements. In adults the meniscus usually tears during sport activities. In elderlies the tear may be due to a natural age-related degeneration of the meniscus or a rough arthritic femoral bone surface tearing into the softer meniscus. Typical symptoms of a meniscus injury is pain at the joint line and a “locking feeling” when bending the knee.

    Minor meniscus injuries usually recover with the help of physiotherapy. First, treatment aims at reducing pain and swelling. Then, exercise therapy helps restoring full function.

    However, due to poor blood supply, larger meniscus tears might not heal and surgery may be required (meniscectomy). Post-surgical rehabilitation takes about 6-12 weeks depending of the complexity of the surgery. After successful completion of the rehabilitation the patient will have regained full function of the knee without any restrictions in daily life and sport.

  • Osteoarthritis

    Knee osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition where the articular cartilage of your knee joint gradually wears away, exposing the underlying bone. As your knee arthritis progresses, bony spurs also develop in and around your knee joint in response to the change in load distribution and biomechanics. Common causes are age, overweight, excessive loading sports, previous knee injuries and genetics. Although this is a chronic condition you can have acute episodes as well. The cause for this is overloading during sport, daily activities and even work. The symptoms are pain, stiffness, swelling, warmth around the knee, clicking or grating and decreased strength of the lower limb muscles. During an acute episode physiotherapy helps to reduce pain, inflammation signs and regain flexibility.

    During non-acute episodes it is very important to do regular exercises in order to optimize strength, stability and flexibility. This will help to maintain your knee’s function and to avoid surgery. Your physiotherapist will tailor a trainings program for your specific needs.

    In advanced stages of osteoarthritis pain might become chronic even with regular exercises. In this case knee replacement is the last resort of help (please click for more information on knee replacement)

  • Knee replacement

    Knee replacement, or knee arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure to replace the weight-bearing surfaces of the knee joint to relieve pain and disability. It is most commonly performed for osteoarthritis (wear & tear of the cartilage). That’s why this procedure is mostly seen among the elderly population. Knee replacement surgery can be performed as a partial or a total knee replacement. In general, the surgery consists of replacing the diseased or damaged joint surfaces of the knee with metal and plastic components shaped to allow continued motion of the knee. The rehabilitation takes 6-12 months depending on the recovery process. After successful completion of the rehabilitation the patient can participate in life without many restrictions. Sport activities have to be adjusted and the knee might not be able to fully bend.

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Lower Leg Injuries

Lower Leg Pain & Injury Treatment

Lower leg injuries mainly involve bone fractures due to a trauma or muscular problems due to sport injuries.

  • Price List

    1 session

    S$ 70

    5 session

    S$ 665

    20 session

    S$ 1,260

    1 session

    S$ 90

    5 session

    S$ 855

    20 session

    S$ 1,620

    1 session

    S$ 110

    5 session

    S$ 1,045

    20 session

    S$ 1,980

Common Lower Leg Injuries:

  • Calf strain

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome is one of the most common knee complaints and describes pain behind the kneecap, (usually after sitting for a longer period, walking stairs or sport) where the patella (kneecap) articulates with your thigh bone (femur). This joint is known as your patellofemoral joint. The pain is caused by misalignment of the knee cap, which results in irritation of the cartilage or bone beneath. The most common causes of patellar misalignment are an abnormal muscle imbalance (weak vastus medialis oblique or VMO or tight ITB) and poor biomechanical control.

    Physiotherapy helps to re-align the patella by specific exercises to strengthen and stretch the muscles around the knee. After completion of treatment patients can return to their sports without any restrictions.

  • Patellar tendonitis

    Patellar tendonitis is an overuse injury affecting your knee. A common name for it is jumper’s knee or runner’s knee. It is the result of your patella tendon (tendon of the quadriceps) being overstressed due to repetitive sport activities, sudden increase in trainings intensity or generally too high trainings intensity. Pain is located in the front of the knee and may occur during or after activities.

    During the acute stage physiotherapy helps to reduce pain and inflammation signs. Once the condition improves exercise therapy incl. stretching-, strengthening- and stability exercises helps to restore full function of the knee and to avoid reoccurrence.

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Foot Injuries

Foot Pain & Injury Treatment

The most common injury to the ankle we see in our Physiotherapy clinic is a sprained ankle. This can happen during sports or any daily activity and occurs in various degrees of severity. Since the ankle joint is a weight bearing joint it is prone to degenerative injuries such as arthritis. Usually this has an effect on the gait pattern, which may lead to secondary problems affecting muscles and ligaments.

  • Price List

    1 session

    S$ 70

    5 session

    S$ 665

    20 session

    S$ 1,260

    1 session

    S$ 90

    5 session

    S$ 855

    20 session

    S$ 1,620

    1 session

    S$ 110

    5 session

    S$ 1,045

    20 session

    S$ 1,980

Common Lower Leg Injuries:

  • Ankle sprain

    Sprains refer to injuries to a ligament. Ligaments are connected to bones and stabilize the joint in between them.

    1. Grade I sprain: A grade I (mild) sprain causes overstretching of the ligaments with no joint instability. A person with a mild sprain usually experiences minimal pain, swelling, and little or no loss of functional ability. Bruising is absent or slight, and the person is usually able to put weight on the affected joint.The average healing time is 2-4weeks.
    2. Grade II Sprain: A grade II (moderate) sprain causes partial tearing of the ligament and is characterized by bruising, moderate pain, and swelling. A person with a moderate sprain usually has some difficulty putting weight on the affected joint and experiences some loss of function. An x-ray or MRI may be needed.The average healing time is 4-6 weeks.
    3. Grade III Sprain: A grade III (severe) sprain results in a complete tear or rupture of a ligament. Pain, swelling, and bruising are usually severe, and the patient is unable to put weight on the joint. An x-ray is usually taken to rule out a broken bone. This type of a muscle sprain often requires immobilization and possibly surgery.The average healing time is 6-12 weeks.

    Physiotherapy optimizes the healing process. Exercise therapy, incl. stretching-, strengthening- and stability exercises helps to restore full function of the foot and to avoid reoccurrence.

  • Plantar fasciitis

    Plantar fasciitis is a painful condition affecting the bottom of the foot. The plantar fascia is a thick fibrous band of connective tissue originating on the bottom surface of the calcaneus (heel bone) and extending along the sole of the foot towards the toes. Pain is mostly felt under the heel and along the arch of the sole. Early symptoms usually occur with the first steps in the morning or after sports. Once the inflammation becomes more severe pain can be felt during sports or even with every step. The most common causes are overstressing during sports, esp. running, a heel spur, wrong footwear, flat feet and poor biomechanics during running.

    About 90 percent of people with plantar fasciitis improve significantly within two months of initial treatment. Physiotherapy aims at reducing pain and inflammation, stretching and strengthening. At PhysioActive we offer shockwave therapy, which is an innovative, highly effective treatment for plantar fasciitis. If flat feet is the cause of the problem your physiotherapist will refer you to our podiatrist to investigate if insoles are needed. Often poor biomechanics are contributing factors. In this case we recommend to do a biomechanical running analysis with our specialized physiotherapis

  • Achilles tendonitis

    Achilles tendonitis is one of the most common problems in the foot and refers to an inflammation of the Achilles tendon, which is part of the calf muscles. It is an overuse injury mostly seen in running or jumping activities. It may seem to happen suddenly, but in most cases it is the result of gradual wear and tear to the tendon from overuse or ageing over time. Contributing factors may be flat feet, muscle tightness or weakness, running on hard surface, poor biomechanics, wrong footwear, forefoot running and more.

    Physiotherapy aims to reduce pain and inflammation signs including modalities, massage and stretching and strengthening exercises. At PhysioActive we offer shockwave therapy, which is an innovative, highly effective treatment for achilles tendonitis. Depending on the cause of the problem the help of our podiatrist is needed. If running and poor biomechanics are the cause of the problem we recommend to do a biomechanical running analysis with our specialized physiotherapist.

  • Heel spur

    Heel spurs are a common source of heel pain. A heel spur is a bony growth attached to your heel bone (calcaneus) and grow into your foot arch. This may irritate the surrounding tissue causing an inflammation. The most common symptom is plantar fasciitis (please click for more information on plantar fasciitis). Treatment of heel spurs is similar to plantar fasciitis treatment. Your physiotherapist will select the most appropriate treatment modalities for you..

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 Don’t see your condition?

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